A national security expert says political correctness may once again prevail in the case of a female Muslim student who wants to wear a headscarf with her Army uniform during ROTC events.

The U.S. Army recently granted an exemption to a captain who wanted to wear a beard and turban in accordance with his Sikh faith. Now the historic Citadel military academy in Charleston, South Carolina, is considering whether to grant the request of a female student who wants to wear a Muslim head scarf, known as a “hijab.”

According to The Washington Post, the school is considering a second request as well from the student: that she be allowed to cover her arms and legs during exercise. The Post also clarifies that the woman has been “admitted” to the school but has not yet chosen to attend.

At least one student posted on social media that Citadel cadets willingly give up their individuality and become a part of a group that upholds the time-honored traditions of the school. Lt. Col. Robert Maginnis (USA-Ret.), senior fellow for national security at the Family Research Council, concurs, explaining that The Citadel is bound by Army regulations.

“It does have Reserve Officers Training Corps there – and they’re supposed to abide by certain rules and regulations to include dress code,” he states. “If, in fact, they allow this female to dress inappropriately – and that means wearing a head scarf during ROTC activities – then it’s a violation of Army regulations.”

But Maginnis says it’s unfortunate that the military is becoming more and more subject to the whims of political correctness.

“Whether it has to do with homosexuals or has to do with women in combat or it has to do with Sikhs wearing turbans and the like,” says Maginnis, “that’s the reality of what you get when you put a progressive president in charge of the armed forces of the United States. And we will suffer directly as a result.”

A Citadel spokeswoman told the Post that if the religious accommodation is granted, it would possibly be the only exception allowed to strict uniform requirements in the school’s nearly 175-year history.

—-

Copyright OneNewsNow.com. Reprinted with permission.

No votes yet.
Please wait...