University of Missouri quarterback Drew Lock became the latest athlete to apologize for offensive tweets sent when he was a teenager.

The Columbia Daily Tribune reported it received an email tip from a reader pointing to several tweets in the star quarterback’s Twitter account which date back to 2011 when he was 14 years old and in middle school.

The paper published what it said were “two of the more insensitive tweets,” out of five total.

“Hahahah kids a faggot,” read one.

“Could geico really save u 15% or more on car insurance??…….Do black guys like flamin hot cheetos?? Hahaha no affence black guys!” read the other.

The Daily Tribune contacted the Unversity’s athletic department for a response prior to publishing the tweets.

Lock then issued a statement in response.

“I was recently made aware of five tweets from my eighth grade year in middle school that were perceived as insensitive and inappropriate.” “An anonymous person brought these to the attention of the Columbia Daily Tribune, and I appreciate having the opportunity to address them.”

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“I didn’t intend to offend anyone with those messages, but I understand that this is an example of how words, even when written by a young teenager, can be interpreted by others as newsworthy, harmful and inappropriate,” he added.

Lock joins Atlanta Braves pitcher Sean Newcomb and Washington Nationals shortstop Trea Truner, who recently apologized for racist and homophobic tweets made when they were 17 and 18 years old respectively, also lacking context by the media as to what spurred these young men to send the tweets and why they are relevant seven to eight years after their issuance.

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Don Irvine

Don Irvine is CEO of Accuracy in Media. He is active on Facebook and Twitter. You can follow him @donirvine to read his latest thoughts. View the complete archives from Don Irvine.

© Copyright © 2018, Accuracy in Media

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