Last Updated:September 18 @ 09:58 am

Threat of lawsuit forces removal of 10 Commandments from classrooms

By Times Record (Fort Smith, AR)

MULDROW -- It was standing room only in the spacious Muldrow Public Schools cafeteria as hundreds of area residents crowded into a School Board meeting Monday to discuss the Ten Commandments plaques posted in each classroom for two decades.

The plaques, which had been donated to the district in the early 1990s, were removed by Monday.

Many attendees arrived in vehicles upon which Christian slogans were written or posted. Many wore clothing proclaiming their religious beliefs. Many teens attended, wearing black "Don't Quit for Christ" T-shirts. Several elderly attendees clutched Bibles. Attendees' ages ranged from infant through senior citizen.

Muldrow First Assembly of God Senior Pastor Shawn Money, a representative of the Christian Muldrow Ministry Alliance, told school officials, "We understand the last two weeks have been very difficult for you. We support you. We're praying for you. ... We know that in 1980 the Supreme Court ruled it was unconstitutional to have the Ten Commandments in public schools for religious purposes. ... We disagree."

Many audience members called out "amens."

Money said the many Christians in attendance do believe the Ten Commandments have a place in public classrooms and that they are a foundation of our nation. He said the attendees are grateful the Commandments had been in the school for 20 years and hoped they would be again.

In an essay Money wrote and read, "I am the Ten Commandments," he stated that they were written first by God, passed down through generations and would endure until the end of time. The Ten Commandments, Money said, are the voice of morality and "the thread of the fabric that has held many nations together."

When he finished, the crowd shouted loud "amens" and gave Money a lengthy standing ovation.

When Board President Scott Chambers called for board discussion, there was none.

School attorney Jerry Richardson of Tulsa said he was not going to try to change the attendees' minds, nor would the school board want him to try.

"They wish the Ten Commandments could remain in the classrooms. Unfortunately, it is my unpleasant job to tell you the situation is otherwise," Richardson said.

The 1980 legal case cited by Money stemmed from a Kentucky law that mandated the placement of the Ten Commandments in public schools, Richardson said. The law was challenged and the lawsuit made its way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which not only ruled that it was unconstitutional, but the high court also stated that the Constitution guarantees not only freedom of religion but also freedom from religion, Richardson said.

Richardson told the crowd that early this month, the district had received a letter from the Freedom From Religion Foundation threatening a lawsuit if the plaques were not removed. An unnamed Muldrow student had complained to the organization that the commandments were posted in every classroom.

Respect

A notice on the foundation's website states: "'We are pleased the school administration has removed the Ten Commandments in compliance with the Constitution. This is settled law. Public schools cannot advance or endorse religion,' said FFRF Co-President Annie Laurie Gaylor. She added, 'We hope the board will honor thy constitution and heed the advice of its attorney rather than to acquiesce to pressure from a religious mob.'"

The hundreds present at Monday's board meeting were calm and respectful, even applauding Richardson after he delivered news many would have preferred not to hear.

Chambers' voice choked as he told the audience the board wished it had another alternative, but removed the plaques rather than spend taxpayer money for costly legal fees that would be incurred fighting to keep them.

Two parents who did not identify themselves asked the board what rights their children had regarding religious expression.

Richardson told them their children also enjoyed freedom of speech and could wear and post anything that did not violate school policy. If the school permits nonreligious expressions, it cannot discriminate against religious expressions by the students. However, he said, the students cannot post such expressions on school property because that would be interpreted as school- or state-sponsored expression.

To a mother who asked if the students could post the Ten Commandments on their lockers, Superintendent Ron Flanagan responded that the district does not allow locker postings.

After the meeting, several attendees, not all of them local, expressed dismay at the removal of the religious plaques.

Freddie Gauntt of Fort Gibson said he attended "to help stand up for our beliefs in God."

He asked why one or two persons can change things in a Democratic society.

"It should have gone to a vote of the community. It upsets me that the federal government has a set of guidelines that are not godly in nature," Gauntt said.

An elderly lifelong Muldrow resident who declined to give her name said she attended the meeting because she believes in God and the commandments.

A Muldrow mother, Glenna Middleton, said she attended to support her eighth-grade daughter.

"My kid stood in prayer with her friends all week. This is a pivotal point in the community, and it is wrong that 10 people in there can change things," Middleton said.

Middleton's daughter, Taylor Middleton, said, "I think it's wrong, and we should keep it in our school. It's what we believe."

---

GOPUSA Editor's Note: The student who made this complaint has identified himself now that he has successfully forced the school district to comply with his wishes.

___

(c)2013 Times Record (Fort Smith, Ark.)

Visit Times Record (Fort Smith, Ark.) at www.swtimes.com

Distributed by MCT Information Services

A service of YellowBrix, Inc.

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88 Comments

  1. ucb1983Comment by ucb1983
    May 14, 2013 @ 1:46 pm

    Interesting story, but right decision by the school board … if the posting were from the Quran, many of these same parents and supporters would have been calling for their removal.

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    • countryoforiginComment by countryoforigin
      May 14, 2013 @ 2:11 pm

      ucb1983: you’re comparing apples & oranges. Neither the Qur’an nor Islam have any role in the founding of this country much less in the ethical culture of most small American communities. The Bible is very much a key player in this country’s founding and Mosaic law is embedded in our own legal system.

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    • cazzieComment by cazzie
      May 14, 2013 @ 2:14 pm

      If the postings were from the Qu’ran we’d be living in a Muslim country under shariah law. The downgrade of our society has escalated since the 10 commandments and pledge of allegiance have been voted out of the classroom. Guess you don’t remember that the New England Primer (our founding text book) was always about a Godly influence. We are a Christian nation-but the Left and this administration are trying their hardest to change this. It will only be to our continued downfall!

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    • tiny1pjComment by tiny1pj
      May 14, 2013 @ 2:15 pm

      What about the burkas (sp?) that students in TX had to wear? Where is your complaint about a RELIGIOUS article being forced to wear by students who are NOT muslim?

      This is the USA, where the constitution grants us the freedom to express religion. The wording is clear, and idiots/terrorists of the ACLU and the FFR should have been given a swift boot in their 4th point of contact when they STARTED to attack it. The wording, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof”, has been turned upside down.

      Now we have radical islam trying to force sharia law in places like Dearborn; Teachers making students wear Islamic dress in TX; Mormons allowed to have class time (leaving school grounds during the class day) for going to their religion classes at nearby “institutes of religion”.

      These are the very reasons I believe that we are closer now than at any time since the American Civil War to an armed revolution to attempt to return this nation to what our founders were searching for – a place where the Government is to protect it’s citizens, and allow them “Life, Liberty, and the PURSUIT of Happiness”.

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    • p3driverComment by p3driver
      May 14, 2013 @ 2:33 pm

      On the face of your comment, it sounds reasonable. At least to an uneducated person. The flaw in your logic is that all of our laws are based on one or more of the 10 commandments, not on sharia law. However, thanks for posting and therefore allowing me to make a statement which will come as a revelation to not only you, but many other “Americans” who are as equally uninformed.

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    • LardoComment by Lardo
      May 14, 2013 @ 2:47 pm

      “…if the posting were from the Quran, many of these same parents and supporters would have been calling for their removal.”

      Removing Christianity leaves a void. The day is coming when that void will be filled by Islam. And in that day, I predict, the people who oppose the 10 Commandments would defend the Quran.

      What we are seeing, and have been seeing for the last 50 to 60 years, is a slow, systematic removal of God from our society. Only to be replaced by the glimering darkness to which we are being acclimated.

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    • gopluvaComment by gopluva
      May 14, 2013 @ 2:48 pm

      Right. We were not founded under islamic law. Anyway the constitution says “of religion” not from religion. The supreme court should not have read it wrongly just so they could let them get rid of the 10 laws upon which helped forge our country to its former greatness.I wonder how many people complained about them. One?Who was harmed bt them? A religious mob. Not just plain parents who grew up with the tablets in their classroom and want them for their children as well? I think each child should be sent to school with a pocket size copy of the constitution highlighted where necessary and a copy of the tablets inserted therein.

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    • Jack ReacherComment by Jack Reacher
      May 14, 2013 @ 3:07 pm

      @ucb1983 – The HELL with Islamic law! If they, or anyone else don’t like the fact that this nation was founded under God’s rule. 10 of which those rules were predominantly displayed at the school … Until some jerk-nerd thought he would show his hass and start whining about something he doesn’t give a krap about. No wonder the kids of today are like they are; Godless.

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    • mcrankComment by mcrank
      May 14, 2013 @ 5:23 pm

      Freedom From Religion Foundation. I was totally unaware that they were enslaved by religion in the first place.

      So, I’m curious—do the members of this lobby group feel any real change in their lives now that these plaques have been taken out of this school? Is there anything of any real consequence that has had any measureable change in their day-to-day lives? How about anything dramatic?

      The obvious answer is “No” because in order to be freed from something you must first be entrapped by it. The 10 Commandments are societal laws given by God to Moses and handed down through successive generations. While they are God’s laws—adherence is completely voluntary—they are not thrust upon anyone. Another frivolous charge leveled by some special interest group with their wishes granted in a court of law by another Liberal or spineless Conservative judge.

      Conservatives better start getting some backbone and standing their ground while there is ground left. It seems like every other week there is a story like this on this forum and it always ends in favor of the special interests.

      If you don’t like religion or Christianity—don’t practice it—it’s that simple—but leave those alone who do. You’re not being coerced in any way. Public displays of Christianity pose no threat to you—they are displays—a public testament of the heritage of this country. If you don’t like this country’s heritage—get the H out and go find you another one.

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    • lokiswifeComment by lokiswife
      May 14, 2013 @ 6:24 pm

      A student complained and the Ten Commandments were removed. What ever happened to tolerance for other religions? Or is that politically uncorrect now? Will they also forbid Christmas and other holiday decorations in the classrooms to avoid offending that student? The Ten Commandments isn’t just a religious statement, it’s a plan for living a good life.

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    • bornleftokComment by bornleftok
      May 15, 2013 @ 9:34 am

      As a conservative, I completely agree with the removal. This is not a theocracy, and government intrusion into my life through religion is not acceptable. All you above me say comparing this to posting Koran scripture isn’t the same for various reasons, but you’re wrong. It is the same. It’s called theocratic government. If you don’t want Sharia Law, then you should be against Christian Law via our government. Our nation isn’t Christian based, it’s constitutionally based. And that constitution ensures our government won’t force religion of any kind on us, not Islam, not Hinduism, not Christianity, etc.

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    • scalesofjusticeComment by scalesofjustice
      May 15, 2013 @ 11:04 am

      Yeah, country of origin and the others are right! NOT. If countryoforigin and the others are correct, THE UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION WAS FOUNDED ON GOD AND SLAVERY. The founding fathers believed and loved the Bible SO MUCH that they decided that black people were only 3/5′s of a person, less than a whole person. Of course, God authorized this in the Ten Commandments. Then the Supreme Court Judges, 9 of them, all voted to hold Dred Scott as a slave. I presume these Christian judges went to church every Sunday and professed to LOVE there fellow man and slave all the while sleeping with the slave women, beating the slave men and hanging those who sasses Master. Then, in 1893, the Supreme Court, those 9 God fearing judges, decided separate but equal. So far the next 70 years, much of the nation backed the Ku Klux Klan! The Klan was founded on Christianity, it’s true.

      Yes, we really should allow the local voters, be it state wide or smaller governmental entity decide this issue. If that were so, black people in the south would never have gotten the right to vote. Hell, black people in the south would still be slaves, Christian slaves though……..cause don’t you know….the Civil war was NOT ABOUT SLAVERY BUT STATES RIGHTS.

      Guess what, I am a Christian. I taught my kids the 10 commandments. A sign on a wall may be a reminder but parents do a much better job of teaching the commandments. People getting all upset and indignant….if you must, have kids wear tee shirts with the commandments on them…..somebody can make a ton of money off God’s law SELLING THE SHIRTS…..after all, our country is all about MONEY, NOT GOD.

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    • countryoforiginComment by countryoforigin
      May 15, 2013 @ 11:19 am

      Scales of justice: you seem overly frothy about so many things I can’t and won’t attempt to take you on. But yes, the Bible does discuss slavery as a matter of facts for its times. Sadly, many Christians did use the Bible to justify slavery. I don’t know what religion the black Africans who sold their fellow Africans into slavery around the world followed, probably animism. Anyway, you should know that slaves were declared less than a whole person in value in order to prevent the Southern plantation owners from having too much power in Congress. It was actually to benefit the slaves. Read your history and don’t take your pent up anger over slavery out on me. That was a long time ago, signed Jay Carney

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    • scalesofjusticeComment by scalesofjustice
      May 15, 2013 @ 1:17 pm

      Thank you for the history lesson Jay…..I really really appreciate that the forefathers looked out for the interest of, as you say, black Africans, by not giving them freedom or voting rights….oh that’s right….this country was founded on FREEDOMS. NOT! It took from 1776 to 1964, almost 200 years, before this great nation figured out that racism is not a part of Christianity. Why? Sounds like the Christians that found this nation compromised their spiritual values……go figure……deep in your heart you know it was all about money…..the love of money is the root of all evil.

      Just so you know, I KNOW THERE WERE “GOOD” white people. Slavery nor it’s lingering prejudice, bigotry and discrimination would have not ended absent the blood, sweat and tears absent white people who truly truly cared. In fact, founding members of the NAACP were white. I will be eternally grateful to them.

      To sum things up, I don’t think God cares if the Ten Commandments are posted at school. The Israelites had the commandments and didn’t keep them. It’s the heart that counts. You know that. So you tell me, what was in the hearts of our forefathers and the slave owners. Was Christianity the guiding force behind the Constitution or was it money!

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  2. long38Comment by long38
    May 14, 2013 @ 1:59 pm

    When are the people going to wake up and fight. If I remember right the people pay for the buildings that the government uses and also pays for the school buildings. So in my eyes we own the buildings not the government or the schools. So it should be up to the community to decide what is placed in their building. NOT THE COURTS. The governments and schools use of the buildings are loaned to them from us taxpayers. They do not own them. So really it is not a government building. It should be up to the voters of the community whether we want them or not. Put it to a vote in each community and decide once and for all. If someone doesn’t want them there then let them get a petition to place it on the ballot.

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    • buster2012Comment by buster2012
      May 14, 2013 @ 2:51 pm

      You must follow the constitution – and not just when it suits you.

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    • p3driverComment by p3driver
      May 14, 2013 @ 3:03 pm

      For BUSTER2012:
      Are you addressing your comment to obama or eric holder, I can’t tell?

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    • jayelkComment by jayelk
      May 14, 2013 @ 3:12 pm

      Buster2012 – You want to quote the constitution? Let’s go there! Please!
      That great document was created to LIMIT what the federal government does. No where in the constitution is the federal government allowed to run our schools or mandate what our children learn.
      So, let’s follow the constitution (not just when it suits you) and remove the government from our schools.
      God was there first.

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    • long38Comment by long38
      May 14, 2013 @ 3:15 pm

      Buster2012 You are missing the point of my comment. Its the taxpayers buildings not the schools or the Governments property. WE the taxpayers are the ones that own the buildings so we should be the ones to decide. Not some government agency. We the people. Meaning the voting public.

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    • bornleftokComment by bornleftok
      May 15, 2013 @ 9:38 am

      The student and his family who spoke out against the posting of the commandments are also tax payers. Their money helps maintain that school, and that child deserves freedom, just like everyone else.

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    • mach37Comment by mach37
      May 15, 2013 @ 1:47 pm

      bornleftok, should the wants of one taxpaying family decide what the hundreds of other taxpaying families can do, regardless of religion, or lack thereof? This decision in favor of one student is in effect making a law regarding religion, i.e., unconstitutional.

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  3. davebnmComment by davebnm
    May 14, 2013 @ 2:17 pm

    If it wasn’t for all of the hypocrites that say that they are “Christian” and actually followed the 10 Commandments as well as the teachings of Jesus Christ, I wouldn’t have a problem here. If you want to post religious material in a public, taxpayer building, then wouldn’t it be necessary to start posting government material in religious establishment to make sure that the law is also followed? Isn’t that how the Taliban do it in Muslim-istan? It is.
    We fought against the Church of England for religious freedom and to be able to worship or not to worship as we saw fit.

    A true believer of God need not flaunt it.

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    • p3driverComment by p3driver
      May 14, 2013 @ 2:45 pm

      Interesting way to put things. Nothing like making a sweeping statement that all Christians are hypocrites. That’s not very effective. It would seem you have had an issue with either Christianity or a Christian in the past to make such a statement, and if that’s the case, I hope you find closure someday, and soon. Thank you for your VN service from another VN vet. Good luck.

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    • tiny1pjComment by tiny1pj
      May 14, 2013 @ 3:00 pm

      Most wars are started and fought in an attempt to force the aggressor’s will upon the defender, as the current “Global War On Terror” (GWOT) is. We did not attack Islam, they attacked the USA or it’s allies MANY times. Most people do not remember the almost daily attacks on Israel after the UN established the modern borders. And EVERY time Israel responded, they were called aggressors for simply EXISTING!

      As for the basis of the majority of our laws, you are right that they are based on the “10 Commandments”, but when you search you will see that most major religions, including those not based on the Judeo/Christian/Islam, have the majority of their “rules” based on similar commands! It was a surprise to me when I first found that, but it made sense, and strengthened my own faith.

      To my knowledge, ALL “Christ based” and “Judaism” based faiths accept the 10 commandments as the basis of law, but not the whole law. It is only the more radical views that oppose them, and they either want all religion destroyed, or all but their own destroyed. Hence, we have to deal with hate groups like the “freedom from religion” groups.

      I grew up in a home where my mother HATED God, and I never saw or read a bible. The only good that came out of that was that I researched everything someone tried to teach me. The end result is that I worship with a “fundamental” group that teaches the Bible, not some man’s interpretation of it. Our sons were taught the same, to examine everything that someone tries to teach them. And this is what was taught by the apostle Paul – saying that those in Berea were more noble minded because the “searched the scriptures daily” to make sure what he taught was in agreement with the scriptures.

      If the people who call themselves Christians were to live by his teachings, and those of his apostles, the Crusades would have never happened. But that does not stop the daily attacks of these terrorist on anyone that is not just muslim, but those of the same sect of islam. It was a band of muslims that attacked the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and attempted to attack the White House. A group we know as alqaida (sp?) and the Taliban were behind this and the other two KNOWN attacks on the WTC.

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    • davebnmComment by davebnm
      May 14, 2013 @ 3:24 pm

      @p3driver – Yes, I have had many run ins with religious hypocrites and just plain, downright phonies. This does not mean that I don’t have faith in a power greater than myself.
      We are talking about Christians in this article, but I see the same misguided people that follow their religious leaders blindly in many other religions as well.

      I’m not attacking all Christians, just the bullies and the faux Christians who are so rigidly intolerant that they think that their belief is the only way to enlightenment. It’s kind of obvious that they have not found peace.

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    • p3driverComment by p3driver
      May 15, 2013 @ 8:06 am

      Davebnm, You said “We fought against the Church of England for religious freedom and to be able to worship or not to worship as we saw fit.”
      Small correction. The Puritans and Pilgrims, not the founders of the 1776 era, came here to flee the Church of England and, if you read the original Mayflower Compact, not the watered down version they teach in public school, they came here to “establish a colony for Christianity and the glory of God.” Look it up, it’s a fact. See how much you’re learning? And to think you knew it all.

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  4. thomasjeffersonComment by thomasjefferson
    May 14, 2013 @ 2:19 pm

    Freedom “of” religion, not freedom “from” religion.

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    • davebnmComment by davebnm
      May 14, 2013 @ 3:31 pm

      Then why are you only allowing one? It means “freedom of the establishment.” That means the government cannot favor any religion over another. Schools are paid for by tax money of the entire population, not the chosen ones.

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  5. p3driverComment by p3driver
    May 14, 2013 @ 2:34 pm

    It’s unfortunate that School Boards are caving into the demands of a minority. There are several organizations, ACLJ and Liberty Counsel to name two, that will represent SB’s in legal contests of this type. For free. And to top it off, both of those groups are eager to do so. Someone in Arkansas tell this School Board, please.

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  6. judithcComment by judithc
    May 14, 2013 @ 2:48 pm

    Here’s a great link to the REAL story about “separation of church and state.” http://www.prageruniversity.com/History/The-Separation-of-Church-and-State.html

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    • mach37Comment by mach37
      May 15, 2013 @ 1:26 pm

      Why would anyone vote this comment down? If you disagree with what is in the video you should put your belief in words, in a Reply to judithc. The video is convincing to me.

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  7. buster2012Comment by buster2012
    May 14, 2013 @ 2:48 pm

    What is wrong with you people? It is unconstitutional! That mentality that it is what God wants, so it is right, is what makes religious fanatics. We live by the constitution and it is the same and fair for everyone. Put up the commandments in your home. Accept you are religious Christian fanatics just like Islamic fanatics – there is no difference – you use God to push your agenda no matter what others say or want and in violation of the law of the land. Stop pushing religion on others. The second amendment is in the constitution and those that push to break it are criminals and are just as dangerous to the freedom of us all as the religious fanatics.

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    • long38Comment by long38
      May 14, 2013 @ 3:40 pm

      It is only unconstitutional if the government or the school owned the building but they don’t. The taxpayers do. No government or school has ever paid for anything. The taxpayers do

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    • larlinmelComment by larlinmel
      May 14, 2013 @ 3:42 pm

      buster2012
      The problem is not that we do not live by the Constitution, but you and the Supreme court are historically wrong. The Supreme Court and you along with several others are misinterpreting our great constitution. It is an immutable document. It doesn’t change with the changing of society. Since the First amendment was pasted until 1980 it was never though wrong or against the constitution to have the 10 commandments or any other religious teaching in schools. The first schools were sponsored by the churches in the communities. The first colleges and universities (Harvard, Yale, etc) in America were religious institutions for the spreading of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Historically your interpretation of the constitution is way off base. So really the question you need to ask yourself is “What is wrong with you?” You are the one who is wrong. Read the history of the United States from the beginning using the original writings and not a modern interpretation of it. You and the Supreme Court are dead wrong. From Independence Hall to nearly every monument in Washington DC you cannot deny that this country is founded upon the teaching of the Bible. If you don’t like our great country go create your own. But leave ours alone! We the people demand that we get our history back to the truth!

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    • buster2012Comment by buster2012
      May 14, 2013 @ 10:41 pm

      To “long38″
      LOL – the government represents the people. In theory, the people own the schools and other gov buildings and the gov acts for the people interpreting the constitution for the benefit of all. Just because the 10 c’s were there for years does not make it right anymore than discrimination of the past should be continued when we know it is wrong.

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    • buster2012Comment by buster2012
      May 14, 2013 @ 10:50 pm

      to “larlinmel ”
      This country was founded upon the principles outlined in the constitution and the bill of rights – not the bible. In the past most people were uneducated and belonged to religion out of fear, ignorance, or community or fear of being ostracized. The founders were intelligent enough to exclude religion from government because of the history of England. I don’t want Koran symbols in our schools or gov buildings. If we can have Christian symbols then they can have theirs, and I’m happy that can’t happen. Also, when you are more qualified to interpret the constitution than the supreme court then I will listen to you.

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    • countryoforiginComment by countryoforigin
      May 15, 2013 @ 12:45 am

      Buster2012: larinmel stated many great truths. I don’t know where you got your history of the US from but it seems like maybe you read some essays about slavery or Indians and then just dropped out to smoke dope. Our pioneer forefathers struck out into the wilderness with nothing more than Shakespeare and the Bible. That does not make them ignorant or fearful. I defy you to create civilized communities the way they did. It brothers me that your modern superiority complex attempts to define men, women & children you literally couldn’t hold a candle to.

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    • p3driverComment by p3driver
      May 15, 2013 @ 8:11 am

      Buster, what’s wrong with YOU? You have the partial truth, but not all of the truth, which is, in effect, a falsehood. It may shock you to learn that it is CONstitutional for students to lead prayer in school. You might get your sierra straight before posting BS such as this “This country was founded upon the principles outlined in the constitution and the bill of rights – not the bible.” It might also shock you to learn that the first textbooks used in schools in this country were excerpts of the Bible and the ABC’s themselves were sentences that were completely Biblical. Such as A Adam was the first man God created. You are a victim of the public school system. Try learning what the true history is and you will find out you are spouting hot air. Have a nice day.

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    • larlinmelComment by larlinmel
      May 15, 2013 @ 10:44 am

      buster,

      you are unbelievable! The constitution and bill of rights are founded upon the morality of the Bible. (Even the three branches of government are established upon Biblical principles). And I don’t worship the Supreme Court. They are not infallible. They have been wrong in many decisions. And as an American Citizen I have right to question the Supreme Court. But I will not deny the truth of history just to push an agenda.Our educational institutions of higher learning are pushing agendas and not truth. The liberal agenda is afraid of truth.

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  8. twwtwwComment by twwtww
    May 14, 2013 @ 2:51 pm

    It may not be Christian, but I wouldn’t mind seeing that student get fist full of religion right in the face!

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    • davebnmComment by davebnm
      May 14, 2013 @ 3:03 pm

      You need to read up on Jesus. Religious bullies use violence to make heathens conform. You are right, “It may not be Christian.” It’s kind of Taliban-ian.

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  9. penguin1969Comment by penguin1969
    May 14, 2013 @ 2:57 pm

    Ok fine. Since the 10 Commandments are laws, instead of having them placed on a plaque that is obvious as the 10 Commandments…Place the sentiments throughout the building using modern words. Don’t murder people or you go to prison. Don’t cuss using the word God in it, you will be suspended from school for all cussing. Don’t cheat on your boyfriend/girlfriend, it breaks hearts. Don’t want and/or steal other people’s stuff, it is a crime. Give your mom and dad a hug and respect them as your parents. Don’t make up stories about your friends and lie about them, it is hurtful.
    You get the idea. Who says they have to be listed in a 10 Commandment format…just plaster the school with every day sayings that keep within our laws. There is no law against adultery, for example, but it is grounds for divorce…
    The kids are the ones who go to that school, let them decide how they want to keep the 10 Commandments alive.

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    • p3driverComment by p3driver
      May 15, 2013 @ 8:16 am

      Typical liberal. Ok, so the laws are based on the 10 commandments, but let’s not accept it. Silly rabbit.

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  10. southernpatriotComment by southernpatriot
    May 14, 2013 @ 2:59 pm

    Students can deck their book covers with copies of the Ten Commandments, emblazon the 10 Commandments on their shirts or notebooks, quote the 10 commandments every day in their prayer at public school, all of which are covered under their First Amendment rights as adjudicated by courts throughout this country for many years.

    The students can start a Bible club at school, if any other club is allowed to function there. They can name their Bible Club, the 10 Commandments Bible Club and read or recite the 10 Commandments each time they meet.

    If any reader of this blog or any students at this school or any other public school needs verification of these rights by students, please communicate with American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ) or Liberty Counsel/Institute.

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  11. jayelkComment by jayelk
    May 14, 2013 @ 3:00 pm

    The atheists use the call for ‘separation of church and state’ to mean ‘removal of God from government funded schools’. Sorry, God was there first.
    Remove the government funding, not God.
    Taxpayers, it is time for you to act with your wallets.
    Stop pushing money to them if they will only use that as extortion to force you to abandon your beliefs at the school doorstep.
    I say we kick the government out of our schools. We could do it better anyway.

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    • jmpeakrunnerComment by jmpeakrunner
      May 14, 2013 @ 3:49 pm

      Home schools are an alternative to public schools. And increasingly, home school parents participate in a coop with other parents to provide for sports, trips, social events, clubs, and other school-related activities.

      It is also important to defund school systems that suppress the Christian foundations in our nation’s history.

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  12. wlzevComment by wlzev
    May 14, 2013 @ 3:06 pm

    Put up billboards,on private property displaying the Ten Commandments and/or post them in your homes and businesses. When our founding fathers enshrined freedom of religion in our constitution they did so to prevent the majority religion from oppressing the minority. If you study our countries. colonial history right in thru the 20th century you will discover that their foresight was warranted and born out.

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    • JBQComment by JBQ
      May 14, 2013 @ 3:12 pm

      Let’s take a little jaunt back into history. The pharohs set the rules for society. In Russia, first it was the czar and then it was Communism. A society cannot exist without belief in God or gods. America is still a republic and the people decide the rules. National socialism does not. If it does, then its “54-40″ or fight. Nebuchadnassar does not dictate. It is about time to tear down his “hanging gardens”.

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    • larlinmelComment by larlinmel
      May 14, 2013 @ 3:53 pm

      vizev
      You are so far from the truth. Where did you read your history?
      Freedom was to keep government out of the church. No tax money going to support a church If you believe what you said, you have been deceived and now you are trying to deceive others.

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    • mach37Comment by mach37
      May 15, 2013 @ 1:01 pm

      JBQ, you have really mangled history. Pharaohs in Russia? LOL. Even the Czarists believed in God although they minimized the Christian faith. Nebuchadnezzar lived B.C., and his hanging gardens (if they ever existed) disappeared long before A.D.

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    • mach37Comment by mach37
      May 15, 2013 @ 6:57 pm

      Another aspect of the Founders’ idea of Freedom of Religion had to do almost wholly with different branches of Christianity – Roman Catholic vs. Church of England vs. Protestant, and the several different flavors of protestants. Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism had virtually no influence in the Colonies.

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  13. alfieComment by alfie
    May 14, 2013 @ 3:11 pm

    An incorrect statement in many ways. First, Islam is not the way of life in the U.S. Islam is not a religion, but a way of life. Islam is foreign-based and has no role here. Its practitioners do not live as we do, nor do they assimilate as they should into our society. The U.S. is a Christian nation that was founded on Christian principles. However often the president may utter, “This is no longer a Christian nation,” this does not make it so. No amount of outside insurgents can change these facts.

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  14. jurooComment by juroo
    May 14, 2013 @ 3:45 pm

    The Constitution just says that the government cannot choose one religion for the whole country or a whole state. It is freedom of religion not from religion. Why is that so hard to understand. I am tired of the one person complaint wiping away our right to our traditions. Maybe we should change the Ten Commandments to the 10 Rules of Life. The first commandment could read You have a right to believe in a higher power other than Obama.

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    • kingster1024Comment by kingster1024
      May 14, 2013 @ 5:23 pm

      This is crazy I can’t believe one stinking kid thinks this is terrible to have the ten commandments in school whether you are a Christian or not doesn’t matter the Ten Commandments are great rules to live by imagine if everybody lived by them this world would be a lot better place to live WAKE UP PEOPLE

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  15. kirstyComment by kirsty
    May 14, 2013 @ 4:07 pm

    The Ten Commandments came after Abraham who was righteous by faith without the Mosaic Law. Jesus Christ fulfilled the demands of the Mosaic law, which called for perfect obedience under threat of a curse. Is this judgment what we really want to teach and put on our children? I say take down the Ten Commandments and begin to live in forgiveness and grace.

    The new school plaques shoud read: Always treat others as you would like them to treat you.

    Jesus said, that sums up the teaching of the Torah (Law) and the Prophets. The Golden Rule or the ethic of reciprocity is a universal principle which does not change with the passing of time because it is timeless.

    http://www.teachingvalues.com/goldenrule.html

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    • dodgecharger4404Comment by dodgecharger4404
      May 14, 2013 @ 5:23 pm

      Jesus’ response to the question, “Which is the greatest commandment?” was: “‘You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind.’” This is the first and great commandment. And the second, ‘You shall love thy neighbor as thyself.’ On these hang all the law and prophets.”

      Yes, post these words, along with the Ten Commandments. Anyone who considers them seriously will realize his/her need of grace and forgiveness. Each of us, student or adult would benefit from reading and heeding them, along with society at large, especially when faith is placed in Christ, asking for forgiveness, and His enabling grace to more fully live them.

      However, I have little expectation that any biblical admonition or invitation to salvation would be satisfactory to the ACLU, or individual Christianity hater.

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  16. middlegroundComment by middleground
    May 14, 2013 @ 4:17 pm

    Even though only 4 of the 10 Commandments deal with God, the remaining six are an historic effort to create written rules that should apply to everyone, kings as well as the governed; something some in Congress have forgotten. There is nothing in the 10 Commandments that says “anointed kings and their cohorts don’t have to abide by these universal rules” and Moses kept the rules simple and understandable. When we discovered that the Pelosi House had exempted themselves from the crime of “Insider Trading”, I couldn’t help admiring the simplicity of Moses — “thou shall not steal” and “Insider Trading” is certainly theft.

    Not only should the 10 commandments be displayed, but also the Magna Carta and the Constitution as outlining rules for society, how these rules evolved and why they were so important in understanding America and the rule of law. Human behavior hasn’t evolved in the last few million years, but the rules governing how our societies relate to the individual and to other societies, has very definitely evolved, but is under attack by statists and those seeking power.

    Our country was founded on the principle that with a set of written rules and an effective court system, we didn’t need a king or hereditary aristocracy and the 10 Commandments were a “first draft” of societal rules, but visit a local law library to see complexity in the form of codes, laws, regulations from every government agency. It is assume.

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  17. Antiquityart.comComment by Antiquityart.com
    May 14, 2013 @ 4:40 pm

    …Therefore, take these words of mine into your heart and soul. Bind them at your wrist as a sign, and let them be a pendant on your forehead. Teach them to your children, speaking of them at home and abroad, whether you are busy or at rest. And write them on your doorposts of your houses and on your gates…. Deuteronomy 11:18
    http://www.antiquityart.com

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  18. mach37Comment by mach37
    May 14, 2013 @ 5:24 pm

    I have read that Islam reveres the Old Testament, which implies that they also agree with the Ten Commandments. Please correct me if I am wrong. What that means is, all the complaints about Islam in these comments is wrong, while the voice of one apparently atheist student is causing anguish in the rest of Muldrow society.

    That student deserves ostracizing by the rest of the student body. Or as the Amish would put it, he should be shunned.

    Lest I be shunned myself, I believe that Islam does not deserve the protection of the US Constitution as a religion because of its encouragement of violence against infidels.

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  19. BarbComment by usa4ever
    May 14, 2013 @ 5:43 pm

    I would like to know just why the Ten Commandments arouses such negative responses in groups like this one. After all, we shouldn’t murder or steal or lie. And we should honor our mother and our father. And no matter what religion we are we should honor whatever god we hold dear. If groups like this would spend more time on how to truly make the world a better place and less time on stirring up controversy perhaps they could actually make a difference!

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    • kirstyComment by kirsty
      May 14, 2013 @ 7:19 pm

      By allowing grace to be mixed with the law, the Galatians had perverted the gospel of Christ. Paul had preached the gospel of grace to them, but after he left, some Judaizers came and told them lies like, “yes, it is good that you are saved by grace, but it is not enough for you to just have Jesus. You must also know and abide by law of Moses to be pleasing to God.” In essence, they were saying, “grace is good, but grace must be balanced with the law.” So they talked the Galatians things like the Ten Commandments and told them that they had to be circumcised. Paul’s response was to pronounce a double curse on those who preached the false gospel to the Galatians!

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    • mach37Comment by mach37
      May 14, 2013 @ 7:37 pm

      Kirsty’s answer above has nothing to do with the Ten Commandments. To answer usa4ever, I think some people are just mean-spirited. All I can think of is selfishness and hate as a reason for spiting others, when it comes to making a whole country conform to one person’s will.

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  20. kirstyComment by kirsty
    May 14, 2013 @ 5:48 pm

    All of the Old Testament Law can be placed in the categories of “loving God” or “loving your neighbor.”

    In place of the Old Testament Law, Christians are to obey the law of Christ. Rather than trying to remember the over 600 individual commandments in the Old Testament Law, Christians are simply to focus on loving God and loving others. If Christians would truly and wholeheartedly obey those two commands, we would be fulfilling everything that God requires of us.

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    • mach37Comment by mach37
      May 14, 2013 @ 7:31 pm

      To me, I don’t see much in the Old testament about God loving his creatures – more about his creatures loving him. A jealous God, if you will. And also a not very powerful God if angels, demons, and even humans were able to flout his will so easily. The “Love” makes its appearance in the New Testament.

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  21. tedinpdxComment by tedinpdx
    May 14, 2013 @ 5:57 pm

    Thanks to GOPUSA for assembling you folks all in one place (with apologies to the handful of sane voices on this thread).

    You are the so-called “social conservatives” we have to thank for enabling the Democratic party and the politics of victimhood and entitlement to flourish over the last four decades. You are the reason this country is teetering on disaster, and may not survive the remaining years of the Obama presidency.

    There isn’t even a fraction of difference between your religious conceits and those of the most radical Islamic extremists, except that you folks wrap yourselves in the same flag that flies over my country, while stomping on the basic principles that make this country great.

    Your homophobia and evangelical Christian elitism are no different from the Marxist/Leninist dogma that’s being peddled (successfully) by Obama and his sycophants in the name of “social justice”. And every time you get up on your soap box and start preaching on behalf of your “judeo/Christian” privileges, you alienate more Republican and independent voters from siding with you on the economic and national security issues that really matter to this country (and to the world).

    I have been a Republican since 1971, until October of this year, when I sealed my vote for Mitt Romney, put it in the mail, and then re-registered as an independent. I never want to find myself aligned with ignorant self-righteous bigots of any kind again, be they American Bolsheviks (Obama & his base), Muslim separatists, or evangelical Christian hypocrites, who’ve attached themselves (inappropriately) to the party of Abraham Lincoln.

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  22. conservativepatriotComment by conservativepatriot
    May 14, 2013 @ 6:35 pm

    Stone vs. Graham was simply another obscenely incorrect decision by the Supremes. The Constitution does NOT guarantee freedom from religion, it only prohibits the Federal government from establishing a State religion. Period. If anyone has any doubt about this, he should visit the Supreme Court and observe the carving of Moses with the Ten Commandments, and the Ten Commandments themselves between “The Majesty of the Law” and “The Power of Government” above the Bench on the wall of the Inner Courtroom. How they could reach that decision while looking at that art is a mystery only a liberal could understand.

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    • buster2012Comment by buster2012
      May 14, 2013 @ 11:16 pm

      Religious people have been in positions of power since the beginning and they have violated the separation of church and state. In the past it was impossible to fight that violation, but now it can happen. If a religious item is in the supreme court then if someone challenges it then it should be removed. If a Christian item was removed and some other religious item was installed then you would have a gripe. No religious item should be in any public school or gov building. When people are sworn in the courtroom, do they still put their hand on the bible? I would not do it and hopefully it has been removed. I bet the Catholic school near me has 10 c’s and bibles and statues etc. all over the place and that I agree with, but not in public buildings.

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    • mach37Comment by mach37
      May 15, 2013 @ 12:34 pm

      buster, for many years courts have had optional oaths for those who do not want to swear on the bible.

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    • scalesofjusticeComment by scalesofjustice
      May 15, 2013 @ 12:52 pm

      Mach37, I regret to inform you that you are WRONG! The courts NO LONGER USE THE BIBLE FOR OATHS. Yes, there are optional oaths but placing your hand on the Bible is no longer practiced even for Christians.

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    • mach37Comment by mach37
      May 15, 2013 @ 2:03 pm

      scales, do you have a reference for that? My Google search just now seems to say that swearing protocol depends on which court you are in – no hard and fast universal rule. My comment above still appears to be true.

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  23. sacheveraljames42Comment by sacheveraljames42
    May 14, 2013 @ 7:17 pm

    It is a sad day in America when we have to defend our Judeo-Christian heritage against the ignorant and uncompromising viewpoints of some in our society. That being said, we must obey the law until we can change it and that can only be done when we have appointees to the Supreme Court who have a proven track record that they apply law as provided by the Constitution and not by creating it’s own version of it.
    What harm does a Crucifix or Star of David and yes, even the Ten Commandments do within an educational setting? They are only symbols that remind us to try and do good works within the human arena of life and that sacrifice is part of that experience. Only the insecure and self-centered person trumpets against the supernatural powers that keep the universe in order. For now, it appears that we have to listen to the discontented and whining of the left. Our day will come.

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    • tedinpdxComment by tedinpdx
      May 14, 2013 @ 9:46 pm

      Who are you to say that my kids have to be surrounded with your favored religious artifacts and dogma? I don’t want your 10 Commandments in my kid’s schools any more than I want the Koran, or Mao’s little red book — set out on a pedestal as symbols of a national consensus which does not exist.

      We currently have the words “In God We Trust” printed on our currency. I have no problem with that, even though technically it violates the Constitutional principle. But suppose some George Soros funded team of lawyers files a suit demanding that we put “In Allah We Trust” on our $50 bills, so things balance out? Suppose the Church of Scientology wants “In L. Ron Hubbard We Trust” on the $20 bill, and they launch a legal initiative to make it so?

      You’re right, we do have a Judeo-Christian heritage. But we have a secular Constitution which eschews any state-recognized religion, precisely because our founding fathers recognized that government participation in any form of religious advocacy undermines the religious liberties of all it’s citizens.

      For you to suggest that those of us who demand adherence to this crucial part of our Bill of Rights are therefore members of ‘the left’, is exactly the kind of fascist rhetoric which defines the Left. To utter such a charge is despicable.

      May I remind you: part of your Judeo-Christian heritage has been wave after wave of brutal genocide directed at one or another population of human beings who do not share your beliefs at any given moment in time. This is exactly the same “solution” preferred by the likes of Hitler, Lenin, Stalin & Mao — and it starts with rhetoric exactly like that which you have posted here. It is also the very malignant idea which is being used by Islamic terrorists to justify the atrocities they inflict on innocent people day after day.

      There was a time when anyone who challenged the Christian Church doctrine asserting that the Earth was the center of the universe, could be summarily burned at the stake. Eventually, and painfully, the Christian Church acknowledged and reconciled it’s doctrine to the natural world as mankind’s knowledge of it increased.

      I acknowledge your right to believe in “supernatural powers that keep the universe in order”, and I rarely take the gratuitous step of challenging those beliefs, because as I see it, you’re entitled to believe whatever you want as long as you don’t attempt to impose your beliefs on me. But since you’ve chosen to disparage me for not sharing your belief in “supernatural powers”, I will simply point out to you that the universe as we know it today (and all life on this planet, as we are now beginning to appreciate through empirical science) is so elegant, and so symmetrical in it’s miraculous complexity, that to deny children the opportunity to explore and try to expand their understanding of it — by demanding that they accept primitive “supernatural beliefs” in lieu of real knowledge — is, in my view, an act of inexcusable negligence and abuse by parents who engage in it.

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  24. Pingback: Thread of Lawsuit Forces Removal of Ten Commandments from Classroom (to avoid costly lawsuit), Christians show up and speak out | servehiminthewaiting

  25. crob1Comment by crob1
    May 14, 2013 @ 8:38 pm

    That one, poor, traumatized student is right. The Ten Commandments shouldn’t be in schools where the youth is influenced. I mean, things have been going so well in America since the progressives started their quest to remove all references to God from our society. NOT! People are becoming less and less moral, which is followed by increasingly worse behavior. Who in their right mind, thinks that our world is better off without moral teaching? God, not man, is the author of morals.

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